I made potato salad for a lot less than $60,000

potatosalad3

 

I have table-flipping-She-Hulk rage over that dude who raised at least $60,000 to make a damn potato salad. There was a 3 day period where I may have needed a trigger warning for talk of potato salad.

Which was sad because I really wanted to eat some potato salad. Since,you know, that’s about all I can eat these days and it sounded like a nice change from soup.

Over the weekend, we had salt potatoes for dinner. The next day, I used the leftovers to make what could only be described as Rage Against the Potato Salad Kickstarter Potato Salad. It was good with only a slight aftertaste of bitterness & rage.

It doesn’t take a genius or $60,000 to make tater salad. You take potatoes

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…cut ‘em into chunks. Maybe peel them first. Maybe not. Whatever.

Add some mayo, Dijon mustard,a splash of apple cider vinegar…some herbs (I like dill & lovage). Maybe even chop up some onions, if that’s what you’re into. I like hard boiled eggs in it,too.

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That’s it. How much of each? Who knows. I just throw it together until it looks like potato salad. Like I said, doesn’t take a genius. Or someone who has money. I made a huge bowl for probably about $3.00 or so.

I need a kickstarter for a new house with better lighting in the kitchen so my food photography doesn’t look like crap. This potato salad tasted better than it looked.
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So, now that I showed you how to make a decent potato salad for free, do me ONE favor:

If you have money to throw at a cause, please give it to people who need it and not someone who started a fundraiser as a joke.  If you don’t trust people on the Internet, go buy some potatoes and other good food to donate to your local food pantry. Thanks.

 

 

 

 

Lunchtime Links: how to grow beets, a retractable window garden, and an online map for freegans

Here’s today’s things….

how to grow beets, with brian campbell.

It turns out I’m no Dwight Schrute when it comes to beet growing so I really appreciated that. This is only the second time I’ve grown beets. I could not figure out why my seedlings were so close together. I had no idea the beet seed was actually several seeds. And I had so many questions about thinning.

See,ya’ll? Years of gardening experience and there are still things I have to learn.

 


This is pretty neat. Barreau&Charbonnet created this window garden for people with little space. It extends out during the day so plants can get sun and retracts back in at night.

Retractable Window Planter

Retractable Window Planter

It’s a cool concept. It’s probably not super flexible to different window designs but I bet someone with  DIY skills could build neat custom designs.


 

haul

Caleb Phillips and Ethan Welty founded Falling Fruit , an online resource map for dumpster divers, freegans, and foragers. I checked out my local locations and no freegan sources have been added but lots and lots of fruit & foraging spots. This is the sort of map that thrives with user input. My hope is that freegans will be conscientious when adding comments about the personal and legal safety for other divers. As I’ve touched on here before, some dumpster divers’ main concern isn’t the food safety but more the risk of harassment and arrest , and other issues to do with privilege. 

Recently, the pair has begun speaking at food justice conferences, contacting online freegan communities and handing out stickers, expanding the site’s fan base. Calling it the most extensive and diverse map of its kind, the pair’s ultimate goal is to shed a bright light on the enormous quantity of food that goes to waste–in this country and abroad.

Phillips and Welty are raising money to create a FallingFruit mobile app for foragers and divers through Barnraiser.us, a newly launched crowdfunding site specifically designed for food and sustainability projects. They hope to raise $10,000 by the end of May.

To create the dumpster map, men spent months combing the Internet for dumpster location information and painstakingly checking each entry before adding it to their site. Their hope is that other freegan sites such as trashwiki.org and freegan.info will embed the FallingFruit map.

To date, there are at least 2,500 bins on the map with up to five new ones added daily. Welty estimates that around 500 people are using the site every day and he expects the numbers to rise as summer kicks in. Along with most U.S. cities, map users have entered dumpsters in Antarctica, Jamaica, and even the North and South Pole, says Phillips.

“We wanted to take [dumpster diving] from being a secret hobby to something that illustrates first-hand how ubiquitous food waste is,” says Welty. Despite the fact that 40 percent of the food produced in the U.S. goes uneaten, few people spend much time thinking about food waste. But, Welty adds, “You can only feel [the magnitude of] it when you open up a dumpster and see what’s in it.”

via Civil Eats


 You can’t tell these hens what to do.

 

Lunchtime Links: 20 Protein-Packed Black Bean Recipes, tomato-growing tips, and Tarbuj Ka Chutney

Lunchy links. Writing this as I’m eating leftover tabouleh and fish. Yum

20 Protein-Packed Black Bean Recipes | Brit + Co..


 

10 tomato growing tips

Good tomato growing tips for you newbies out there.

 


Tabuj Ka is watermelon rind chutney.
Tarbuj Ka Chutney
4 cups watermelon rind, fruit and outer green skin removed
and cut into 1 /2 “ pieces

1 cup apple cider vinegar
3/4 cup sweetener
1/4 cup minced fresh ginger
1 Tablespoon minced garlic
salt and pepper to taste

*This chutney pairs well with a spicy main dish.
via here.
Feels like I have ages before watermelon season here.
I haven’t even put mine in the ground.
If you’ve never listened to Leo Kottke, check him out.  He’s one of the most underrated (or maybe just unheard of)  guitar players out there. I love listening to him while I’m getting stuff done around the house.

 

Lunchtime Links: Fire Escape Gardening, using Garlic Mustard Greens, and dealing with canned tomatoes

Some good things to pass along today.

 

Link→  17 Tips For Starting Your Own Herb Garden.

These are all great tips for small space gardening. The tip about buying seedlings versus seeds…might seem counterintuitive since seeds are less expensive but sometimes you have to do that.  do start everything from seed myself but it was a struggle this year to find adequate space. Cats & little kids don’t help.

 


What I Made Today shows how to use wild Garlic Mustard …the whole thing, leaves to roots. You probably have seen this stuff growing like crazy. I have a ton of it I am constantly pulling from the garden. Go ahead an eat it. It’s good stuff.
Link → Garlic Mustard Love


 

Lunchtime Links: Food Stamp enrollment declining,freezing food safely…. + + +

Media preview Hey, this might be good news? Enrollment in SNAP has started to drop. (But in the back of my mind, I’m thinking about how GOP reps wanting to emulate California’s success in discouraging enrollment to many eligible low income people.… )


Five Things To Know About Freezing Foods Safely

Safe prep for freezing, safe thawing…and the freezing food things you need to know. This info comes in handy when you hit a cheap produce bounty. Sorry I can’t do more to help with freezer space. Maybe some TARDIS magic to make it bigger on the inside?


Media preview Awesome urban gardening shot by @corneliadlabaja via



Becoming a water wise gardener is . . . GardenWise! Tips on conserving water pottsmerc.com/lifestyle/2014…

I was thinking about all of you gardeners out there with water issues the other day when watering my garden. We save rain water but sometimes even that doesn’t cut it. Grateful we don’t have a water shortage and that we don’t have to pay a water bill. Here’s hoping this year isn’t too droughty or too floody for us all.

I leave you with some relevant music… This is on my Homestead Mix playlist. Came on while writing this post, so figured I should share.

Lunchtime Links: An app that helps you track down restaurant & grocery store leftovers and a Garden to Cafeteria program in Oakland

foodish things for today…

A new app is coming this fall that lets users buy surplus food from grocery stores and restaurants at a discount. Supermarkets and restaurants will put their excess food inventory into PareUp along with a price and time of availability. Then shoppers using PareUp can see what’s up for grabs and go pick it up.

This could be helpful for low income people who don’t qualify for SNAP. Depending on the food bank, some determine eligibility by whether or not you qualify for SNAP. So, if you don’t get SNAP, you can’t get help from a food bank in some places. This would open up a potential resource for a lot of low income people.

link: ow.ly/wKxN9 via @grist


 

From seed to tray in Oakland: the power of Garden to Cafeteria programs bit.ly/1lfCVAL@CAfarmtoschool

Food Corps service member Danielle Nahal shares her story about how the Garden to Cafeteria program in an Oakland school was formed.

I love Garden to Cafeteria and Farm to School programs. I’m fortunate that both schools my children attend have these. When the one school was in the preliminary planning stages, I was SO excited to be a part of it. I went to that first meeting and was so disappointed. I was the ONLY parent from the district there. There were enthusiastic community members attending but mostly just because they love & have experience gardening. I was sure this was a sign that the program would never fly but it’s coming along nicely.

What Danielle says rings true.

I chose to share this story because I believe that there are times in any movement, in any service or work, when it seems that the obstacles in creating what you believe in seem insurmountable, and your faith and your passions seem misplaced. But for each of those, there are moments when you know that you’ve helped to create something positive, something that you know you can believe in. For me, this experience, from the uncertain steps of the first graders into the cafeteria kitchen to the shared stories of watermelon intersecting across cultures and professions, reminded me that there are deeper connections that are being fostered than I can see. This thought sustains my passion for my service, and my belief that the work that so many of us are doing is creating something better, one leaf at a time.”

 

Lunchtime Links: Stamp Out Hunger, lots of lentil recipes, and another study confirms stuff we know

My laptop is back. Thank the techy gods for buyer’s protection plans. They replaced the screen and it’s as good as new now.

So, back to things like Lunchtime Links!

Tomorrow is the annual Letter Carrier’s Food Drive, better known now as Stamp Out Hunger. On Saturday, May 10th, leave a plastic bag with canned and nonperishable food next to your mailbox. Your letter carrier will donate it to a local food bank.

If you don’t get mail delivery and still want to contribute, check out this list to find a food bank near you.

Does anyone see flyers for this in your own area? I never see anything here. I only know of this event because of social media and I go to my local post office nearly every day. Maybe I’m not aware since I don’t get home delivery?

Speaking of food banks…

via Sustainable Food Trust  -

Affordable healthy diet ‘too expensive for many

This isn’t news around these parts (meaning this part here of the blogosphere). We know that the need for food banks has increased. Eating healthy is really not something that some poor people CAN do.
Meanwhile,I can present studies and personal narratives every damn day ,all day long and I will still hear some people blame poor people for unhealthy eating “choices” ( saying choice implies there is more than one option) , fat-shaming poor people ignoring the “obesity-poverty paradox” and of course, saying poor people aren’t trying hard enough to do for themselves.

On the issue of “concern trolls” (people who raise “concerns” or non-helpful solutions about the things people do or act supposedly out of interest for the good of the people or cause at hand but who actually are working AGAINST what or who they claim to be advocating for, often ignoring the personal narratives and voices of people with the most experience )…. when it comes to the health and nutrition issues, weight is not the primary concern they need to be thinking about. From my perspective, brain health is the most important. Low income kids who don’t get the right food or enough of it can’t excel in school and tend to have more behavior problems. Obviously, the same is true for adults. Who can function well at a job when they’re hungry? Being hungry and not getting the right nutrition can literally make you pretty loopy and affect the way your brain works.

Hangry is a real thing.

 

Ok,enough of that.
How about some recipes? Lentils. Because it’s one thing people are like, “These were cheap but now what the hell do I do with them?”
This is a great list of recipes from Whole New Mom.

Lentil Collage Wmk

“Lentil-fy your life!”

Missing here is this thing my step-daughter makes (regional cuisine of Panama, where the step-kids grew up). Next time we Skype with her, I will ask her for the recipe.I tried to make it from memory but it wasn’t quite the same.
(I really love Skype. My step-daughter is living and going to school in Belgium right now. The other day, she took us on a live tour through her new town and showed us her container garden she has growing. That’s just SO cool,right?)

 

 

 

Ode to Quesadillas

 

I can pretty much put leftovers in a quesadilla and they’re going to be awesome.

We eat a lot of things in tortillas that are quesadilla-ish because 1) tortillas are cheap; 2. versatile; 3. free with WIC (not that we get WIC anymore but it was a perk.

And seriously…get creative. I wasn’t kidding about Leftover Quesadillas.

For anyone new to quesadilla making, here is a great tutorial on how to make them. How To Make Quesadillas

29 Life-Changing Quesadillas You Need To Know About.

 

via b00tiusmaximus

Lunchtime Links: 16 ways to eat dandelion greens, homemade ramen?, and impromptu meal “planning”

Everything food related for today…

 

Hell,yes, DANDELIONS. I may have mentioned this already(?) but I’ve been studying to become a certified herbalist. Herbalists love dandelions. They’re great for cleaning toxins from your system (good for your liver)  but also very handy for relieving pains, especially arthritic type. They’re an anti-inflammatory, a good astringent for your skin…. and they can actually be tasty.

My grandma used to just put them in a salad. That was about as fancy as she got but here are 16 Ways To Eat (or drink) Dandelions. Can’t wait to make the jelly. The dandelion root “coffee” is how you also would make a dandelion root tea but if it feels better to call it coffee, go for it .

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Ramen Made From Scratch

Make your own ramen for less than the cost of ramen - All  you need a pasta maker and 30 minutes ….plus the 2-5 waiting time while the dough rests.

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My Love for Local Food Is a Reasonable Defense for Not Planning Meals Ahead – I can relate to this and as someone who is low income, it’s the most practical , especially in the summer time. Garden shares, roadside stands, discounted produce at the grocery store because of abundance, farmer’s market deals… these are all things that I jump at the chance to score and whatever I score, that’s what’s on the menu.

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Lunchtime Links: Recipes for Novice Canners and FREE Non-GMO SEEDS!

Today’s round-up of food things.

Home canning basics from Attainable Sustainable.

Recipes for the Novice Canner  -the simplest ones to start with, with tips for beginners | via Attainable Sustainable

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 7 Common Kitchen Disasters and How To Avoid Them - Because avoiding food mistakes means less food waste which means saving money. I appreciate the blender tip. Mine has a missing top. I just use a lid from a storage bowl that’s slightly larger than the top of my blender and hold it there.

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Groundswell is giving away free non-GMO seeds. Here’s what you have to do to get some:

SIGN UP FOR HEALTHY SEEDS NOW!

How it Works

  1. Sign up to receive seeds and share the names of at least two friends or family members interested in receiving seeds as well.
  2. Groundswell sends you a packet of open-pollinated, non-GMO seeds from Sow True Seed, a locally-owned company based in Asheville, NC.
  3. By planting these seeds, you are supporting healthy seeds that can be saved and used to reproduce food year after year.
  4. After you have signed up to receive seeds, stay tuned! Below are different ways to connect to receive updates on the campaign from now through the end of April.

- See more at: http://www.groundswellinternational.org/seeds/#sthash.FCvmIxye.dpuf

 

ALSO …
Ann from Bohan Seeds  has very generously offered FREE veggie seeds to readers here. She says, “If you would be interested ,please check my site out but instead of ordering through the site just send email from site with what you want and I will do what I can to comply. Free of course. Please start your email with Poor As Folk so I will know.

Thank you so much, Ann!