No Poo: Why to Forego Shampoo And How it Will Reveal Your Healthiest Hair, Ever

One of my favorite blogs Thrift Core has a great post today on not using shampoo, or as it’s commonly called “No Poo”
No Poo: Why to Forego Shampoo And How it Will Reveal Your Healthiest Hair, Ever.

I haven’t used shampoo in ages. My foray into No Poo began because I couldn’t afford to buy shampoo and the hair care methods when not using shampoo are things that can be purchased with food stamps, but most importantly, they’re food stamp allowable ingredients that are very inexpensive and don’t use a significant portion of your food stamp budget. Not to mention, they can be used for other things in cooking and around the house.

After using “no poo” out of necessity, I discovered that when I had money to buy shampoo, I wasn’t crazy about how my hair felt and went back to no poo.
I use mostly just apple cider vinegar and baking soda for my hair care with an occasional Hair Smoothie whipped up when I need some conditioning. I also have started making my own apple cider vinegar with apple scraps, which helps shave more off the grocery bill.

Social Worker & Mental Health Tumblrs

There’s a wealth of information on tumblr regarding social work & mental health. These are listed together because the issues quite often go hand in hand.
Thanks to Creative Social Worker for putting this directory together.

Social Worker Tumblrs<br /><br />
Creative Clinical Social Worker<br /><br />
Social Workin’<br /><br />
It Will All Make Sense<br /><br />
The Political Social Worker<br /><br />
Social Work Tech<br /><br />
Social Work Helper<br /><br />
Trauma Therapist<br /><br />
Trauma Social Worker<br /><br />
Connect The Dots Backwards<br /><br />
Radical Social Worker<br /><br />
Social Work Memes<br /><br />
Social Werq<br /><br />
Unemployed Social Worker<br /><br />
Student Social Worker<br /><br />
Products of Poverty<br /><br />
SWK 4 Life<br /><br />
What Should We Call Social Work?<br /><br />
School Meet Life<br /><br />
Canadian Social Worker<br /><br />
Joylisamia<br /><br />
Social Justice Solutions<br /><br />
Life as a Social Worker<br /><br />
ACSWA Clinical Social Work<br /><br />
Social Worky Megan<br /><br />
Lauren LCSW<br /><br />
Miss Joan<br /><br />
Heirloom June<br /><br />
The Notorious Amy<br /><br />
The Social Work Network<br /><br />
Social Worker Taking on the World<br /><br />
Social Work Grad Students<br /><br />
Social Work Wisdom<br /><br />
Social Work Sad<br /><br />
School Social Worker Blog<br /><br />
Social Work Psych Stuff<br /><br />
Alison Rae<br /><br />
What Even Is Social Justice?<br /><br />
Chris Talks Social Work Stuff<br /><br />
Southernish<br /><br />
Social Work Bridges<br /><br />
Social Work Wanderer <br /><br />
Social Workers Online<br /><br />
Tito Tito<br /><br />
Hand Knit By a Failed Feminist<br /><br />
The Social Work Exam<br /><br />
The Running Vegan MSW<br /><br />
Social Worky<br /><br />
Social Work Musings<br /><br />
Geeky Therapist<br /><br />
Other Side of the Couch<br /><br />
Steven Armijo<br /><br />
Social Work, Psych and Counseling<br /><br />
All Things Social<br /><br />
June on the West Coast<br /><br />
Chasing Thunder<br /><br />
Social Work Problems<br /><br />
Ramp Your Voice<br /><br />
Onewomanareme<br /><br />
Jehovahs Thicknesss<br /><br />
Ducky Does Therapy<br /><br />
Aspie Social Worker<br /><br />
Social Justice Works<br /><br />
Crasstun<br /><br />
The Social Worker Life<br /><br />
Social Worky Ideas<br /><br />
Therapeutic Nihilism<br /><br />
This is not Social Work<br /><br />
Reflectophile<br /><br />
Therapist Tumblrs<br /><br />
Creative Clinical Social Worker<br /><br />
The Humbled Therapist<br /><br />
Therapy 101<br /><br />
It Will All Make Sense<br /><br />
Trauma Therapist<br /><br />
What Should We Call Art Therapy?<br /><br />
Connect The Dots Backwards<br /><br />
Passionate Therapist<br /><br />
Therapist Confessions<br /><br />
Tenacious Twenties<br /><br />
Kati Morton<br /><br />
PsyD or Bust<br /><br />
Twin Therapists<br /><br />
So This is Expressive Therapies<br /><br />
Ducky Does Therapy<br /><br />
The Angry Therapist<br /><br />
Doctor School Problems<br /><br />
Psychologist Problems<br /><br />
Keep Calm And Psychoanalyze<br /><br />
She Wants the PsyD<br /><br />
Other Side of the Couch<br /><br />
Secrets of a Sarcastic Psychologist<br /><br />
Confessions of a Broke Grad Student<br /><br />
Geeky Therapist<br /><br />
So You’re a Music Therapist<br /><br />
Thrive Music Therapy<br /><br />
Fuck Yeah Therapizing<br /><br />
Misses Torrance<br /><br />
Art Journaling<br /><br />
Therapist at Play<br /><br />
Creative Arts Therapy Rocks<br /><br />
Psychotherapy<br /><br />
Lowery Makes Art<br /><br />
Serious Mental Illness Blog<br /><br />
Psychological Musings<br /><br />
Cognitive Defusion<br /><br />
Chameleon Play Therapy<br /><br />
LaraMaurinoTherapy<br /><br />
Training-Psychologist<br /><br />
Heirloom June<br /><br />
Counseling Inside and Outside<br /><br />
Psych Jim<br /><br />
Mindful Irreverence<br /><br />
The Medicated Therapist<br /><br />
What Should We Call MFT<br /><br />
Therapy Bros<br /><br />
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy<br /><br />
Creative Psychologist<br /><br />
Therapy and Therapists<br /><br />
Counseling Inside and Out<br /><br />
Eevee Pony<br /><br />
Therapy Ideas For Future Clients<br /><br />
Shrink Rants<br /><br />
This list represents a tumblr network of metal health professions from a wide range of backgrounds, intended to help us connect with one another. Click here for some more psych-related blogs.” /></p>
<p><strong>Social Worker Tumblrs</strong></p>
<ul>
<li><a href=Creative Clinical Social Worker

  • Social Workin’
  • It Will All Make Sense
  • The Political Social Worker
  • Social Work Tech
  • Social Work Helper
  • Trauma Therapist
  • Trauma Social Worker
  • Connect The Dots Backwards
  • Radical Social Worker
  • Social Work Memes
  • Social Werq
  • Unemployed Social Worker
  • Student Social Worker
  • Products of Poverty
  • SWK 4 Life
  • What Should We Call Social Work?
  • School Meet Life
  • Canadian Social Worker
  • Joylisamia
  • Social Justice Solutions
  • Life as a Social Worker
  • ACSWA Clinical Social Work
  • Social Worky Megan
  • Lauren LCSW
  • Miss Joan
  • Heirloom June
  • The Notorious Amy
  • The Social Work Network
  • Social Worker Taking on the World
  • Social Work Grad Students
  • Social Work Wisdom
  • Social Work Sad
  • School Social Worker Blog
  • Social Work Psych Stuff
  • Alison Rae
  • What Even Is Social Justice?
  • Chris Talks Social Work Stuff
  • Southernish
  • Social Work Bridges
  • Social Work Wanderer
  • Social Workers Online
  • Tito Tito
  • Hand Knit By a Failed Feminist
  • The Social Work Exam
  • The Running Vegan MSW
  • Social Worky
  • Social Work Musings
  • Geeky Therapist
  • Other Side of the Couch
  • Steven Armijo
  • Social Work, Psych and Counseling
  • All Things Social
  • June on the West Coast
  • Chasing Thunder
  • Social Work Problems
  • Ramp Your Voice
  • Onewomanareme
  • Jehovahs Thicknesss
  • Ducky Does Therapy
  • Aspie Social Worker
  • Social Justice Works
  • Crasstun
  • The Social Worker Life
  • Social Worky Ideas
  • Therapeutic Nihilism
  • This is not Social Work
  • Reflectophile
  • Therapist Tumblrs

    Psychology Tumblrs

    Recovery/Support Tumblrs

    “Poverty is a more powerful influence on the outcome of inner-city children than gestational exposure to cocaine…”

    An extensive study of crack babies conducted in Philadelphia over the span of over 20 years yielded some unexpected results:
    Poverty in the inner-city is more powerful than cocaine.

    “We went looking for the effects of cocaine,” Hurt said. But after a time “we began to ask, ‘Was there something else going on?’ “

    While the cocaine-exposed children and a group of nonexposed controls performed about the same on tests, both groups lagged on developmental and intellectual measures compared to the norm. Hurt and her team began to think the “something else” was poverty.

    As the children grew, the researchers did many evaluations to tease out environmental factors that could be affecting their development. On the upside, they found that children being raised in a nurturing home – measured by such factors as caregiver warmth and affection and language stimulation – were doing better than kids in a less nurturing home. On the downside, they found that 81 percent of the children had seen someone arrested; 74 percent had heard gunshots; 35 percent had seen someone get shot; and 19 percent had seen a dead body outside – and the kids were only 7 years old at the time. Those children who reported a high exposure to violence were likelier to show signs of depression and anxiety and to have lower self-esteem.

    More recently, the team did MRI scans on the participants’ brains. Some research has suggested that gestational cocaine exposure can affect brain development, especially the dopamine system, which in turn can harm cognitive function. An area of concern is “executive functioning,” a set of skills involved in planning, problem-solving, and working memory.

    The investigators found one brain area linked to attention skills that differed between exposed and nonexposed children, but they could not find any clinically significant effect on behavioral tests of attention skills.

    Drug use did not differ between the exposed and nonexposed participants as young adults. About 42 percent used marijuana and three tested positive for cocaine one time each.

    The team has kept tabs on 110 of the 224 children originally in the study. Of the 110, two are dead – one shot in a bar and another in a drive-by shooting – three are in prison, six graduated from college, and six more are on track to graduate. There have been 60 children born to the 110 participants.

    The years of tracking kids have led Hurt to a conclusion she didn’t see coming.

    “Poverty is a more powerful influence on the outcome of inner-city children than gestational exposure to cocaine,” Hurt said at her May lecture.

    Other researchers also couldn’t find any devastating effects from cocaine exposure in the womb. Claire Coles, a psychiatry professor at Emory University, has been tracking a group of low-income Atlanta children. Her work has found that cocaine exposure does not seem to affect children’s overall cognition and school performance, but some evidence suggests that these children are less able to regulate their reactions to stressful stimuli, which could affect learning and emotional health.

    Coles said her research had found nothing to back up predictions that cocaine-exposed babies were doomed for life. “As a society we say, ‘Cocaine is bad and therefore it must cause damage to babies,’ ” Coles said. “When you have a myth, it tends to linger for a long time.”

    Deborah A. Frank, a pediatrics professor at Boston University who has tracked a similar group of children, said the “crack baby” label led to erroneous stereotyping. “You can’t walk into a classroom and tell this kid was exposed and this kid was not,” Frank said. “Unfortunately, there are so many factors that affect poor kids. They have to deal with so much stress and deprivation. We have also found that exposure to violence is a huge factor.”

    Read about the study and the conclusions here.

    At a time when 2 in 10 children are living in poverty in the United States and many of those are living in the inner city, we need to be paying very close attention to what studies like these tell us. This along with the studies that conclude that nutrition is a huge factor on school performance and brain development (also something common sense could tell us), it just doesn’t make sense that “we” are not desperately trying to end child poverty. It’s definitely not a time to be cutting programs that help feed and educate these children plus provide intervention services  to help them and their families out of it.

     

    The Reasons Poor People Might Not Eat Healthy

    I see  a lot of discussions regarding the topic of people living on food stamps/ poor people and “Why can’t they just eat right?” and talks about not letting people buy “junk food” with SNAP.  There are a lot of things your average American who has never lived in poverty don’t consider. People largely seem unaware of obstacles that face poor people when it comes to food or…well…anything at all. They’re failing to grasp that just getting enough food period is a challenge , let alone healthy food.  I’ve had to become a very forgiving person when I see certain remarks but it’s become easier since I’ve made this connection that people who say these things are speaking from a place of privilege and  ignorance and really don’t understand the complexities of food scarcity in the US.

    Here are 5 reasons good food is hard to find for poor people sometimes.

    1. FOOD DESERTS – Imagine you live in a city. There isn’t much in your neighborhood besides a few fast food joints, a  Dollar General & a little convenience store. They have things like milk & eggs but any food beyond that comes in a box or a can & everything they do have healthy is overpriced.  The only time you can get to the nearest real grocery store is when your sister comes and visits because she has a car. There is a Farmer’s Market somewhere in the city but like the grocery store, it’s too hard to get to without a car. With me so far?

    There is a community garden you’ve been told you can get involved in to grow your own food but it’s not in your neighborhood and you have to take 2 buses  to get there and anyway, you work Monday -Saturday and by the time you would get there, it’s dark and to get back home, you would have to walk partially with your 2 little kids in tow because buses don’t run in your neighborhood (not a safe neighborhood,by the way)  past a certain time in the evening.Sunday is your only day off and the time you want to spend with your children.

    You tried growing some things indoors and on a windowsill but 2 windows in the whole apartment… nothing really grew.

    The food pantry run by the church has exactly the same selection as the stores you can shop at – boxed & canned food with lots of preservatives and crap. Nothing fresh.

    I should mention now that this is a common thing I hear in emails from people living in food deserts.

    A food desert is defined as an area that has no food & grocery sources with fresh foods or if they do have fresh foods, they are disproportionately expensive. People affected the most by food deserts are poor people who do not have access to transportation  and the primary affected are single mother & their children, elderly, and disabled. In an area considered a food desert, the rate of obesity & diabetes is much higher and there have been some causal studies that suggest children that live in food deserts don’t do as well in school.  217 million people receiving food stamps live in urban areas compared to about 62 million in rural areas. Food deserts can happen for those in rural areas,too but it’s far more prevalent in urban areas and affects the largest portion of food stamp recipients overall.

    2. The Cheapest Food Is Often Junk 

    Depending on where you live in the U.S., this may not be true but for most of the country, the norm is that junk food is cheep and good food is expensive. A common statement I hear is, “There should be laws that prevent people on food stamps  from buying junk food!”. I may have mentioned before that I have about 3,000 words in my drafts folder on JUST that topic. Let me see if I can summarize a piece of  the issue here in a lot less than 3,000 words.

    Let’s pretend this isn’t an issue attacking the choices of a specific economic class & trying to create a Nanny State that dictates how poor people live and focus on the money aspect here.

    SNAP spending accounts for almost $72 billion dollars and food companies who make junk food want most of that to go in their pockets. They spend millions of dollars every year to lobby AGAINST changes in the food stamp program that would prohibit or limit recipients from buying junk food.  The American Beverage Company, Coca Cola, Pepsi Co, Kellog, Kroger, Walmart, Snack Food Association, Grocery Manufacturers Association ,Mars ,and Cargill have all spent money to not just stop bills from being passed to restrict SNAP expenditures but also to promote their food to poor people as their target market. Debbie Stabenow, the Senate Ag Committee Chairwomen received $1,026,196 from undisclosed lobbyists to prevent restrictions from being introduced in the Farm Bill and also to stop GMOs from being labelled.

    People can see the value in preventing people on SNAP from buying certain foods all they want but as long as the money is lining the pockets of people making up the rules, it isn’t going to happen. The cheapest food available is going to continue to be junk food. Of course, if this pisses you off enough ,you could start a campaign to make some phone calls, write letters and make some noise about the issue.

    But here’s the thing…

    If you restrict junk food then there are contingencies that have to be fought for in place of  the inexpensive source of food for these families. If  you remove junk food from the SNAP program then other things have to be put in place, such as better development of urban and community gardens, access to Farmer’s Markets, and quite simply, better allocation & distribution of food waste from grocery store & the food industry.

    CORRECTION!!!  Debbie Stabenow actually received:   $903,008 from Big Ag  $359,090 from energy industry (also affected by the farm bill)  $1,026,196 from undisclosed Lobbyists and Lawyers  Occupy the Farm Bill   www.facebook.com/stabenow  www.facebook.com/occupythefarmbill

    3. Education

    I worked with children for a long time. There were kids who had never seen a fresh vegetable or fruit in their life. The closest thing to a potato that they knew was a french fry. I want to make it very clear here  – not all these kids came from poor families. In fact, most of them didn’t.  America as a whole needs to learn better nutrition and how to spend their food dollars better. It isn’t just a poor people issue.  It is true that demographically poor people are less educated and also have less access to educational resources but seriously…let’s be honest here – Americans have become a nation of people who make some very poor choices about what goes into their body. Rich or poor.406231_401023336623051_1406311727_n

     

    Let’s also be honest about why there’s a focus on poor people to have better food education. They’re spending “taxpayer money”, so we should be sure they’re spending every dollar wisely. 10 cents a day goes into SNAP…that’s if you make $50,000/ year. Good heavens, yes…we need to make sure this 10 cents a day is being spent on healthy food only and preventing additional healthcare poor people may need on the taxpayer dime. Newsflash: The entire population contributes to the rising cost of health care costs because of their eating habits, regardless of  whether they eat on the dole or not.

    Nutrition education is important for the whole country and I’m in favor for better access to nutrition education for everyone. Like I mentioned,  poor people are the least likely to have access to the resources to make this happen so we need to advocate for programs that enable people in poverty to boost their food knowledge.  One of the best ways to educate on the matters of food & nutrition is to implement more programs like Food is Elementary in US schools and school gardens that can be used not just to supply a cafeteria but also serve as a cross-curricular education opportunity.Start them young and it will set them up for a life of good and responsible eating.

    4. Ability

    A great deal of food stamp recipients are disabled and quite a few of them have limited support people who can cook for them. A can of  Hormel Chili is easy to open and heat in the microwave. Disabled people often encounter the same problems as those in food deserts…inability to travel to a real grocery store  to go shopping. Some areas have great services for disabled people, such as Meals on Wheels but these programs are not available everywhere. Elderly people without support also fall into this category of simply not being able to shop for or prepare food for themselves.

    5. 99% of Homes May Have Refrigerators But That Doesn’t Mean They Have Stoves 

    Anyone else remember when Fox News tried to dispute that America even had poor people because “99.6% of ‘Poor’ Households Have Refrigerators”. Like, because someone has a refrigerator, it means they open the door and magically, food appears! Or the electric bill was magically paid that month so the refrigerator could work. Same applies to stoves . I’ve known some families who could not use the stove in their house or apartment because it was a gas stove, which meant an additional bill they could not pay. Some are fortunate enough to have electricity and can use a microwave but you know what you can cook easily in a microwave,right?  Not to say you CAN’T cook a decent ,healthy meal in a microwave but it’s a bit more difficult. Most who are stuck with microwave cooking tend to favor frozen meals…lots of preservatives,highly processed & low nutritional value. I actually knew one women who didn’t have a microwave or a stove and still made some great meals for her family using a hot plate and a toaster oven but it took a lot of time. On the days she worked outside the home, she had to stick to convenience foods otherwise no one would have been fed in time for bed.  The day she found a crockpot at a yard sale was a happy day indeed.