UConn discriminates against graduate students with families.Anne-Marie from Do Not Faint asked if I would publish her letter to University of Connecticut regarding their new policy regarding insurance coverage of grad students with dependents. I am more than happy to do so. She also wrote her own blog post describing her family circumstances and other thoughts on the new policy.
You can read that whole post here.

I wrote this letter to the president of the university today, Susan Herbst, just to give my rage some outlet, and I’m sharing it, here, so that others know that the University of Connecticut discriminates against students with spouses, partners and children by asking them to pay an exponential greater percentage of the cost of a health care plan. I’m not totally sure I chose the right numbers for the math, but I’m very close. If I go over it again, I’ll just cry.

Dear Dr. Herbst,
Soon, University of Connecticut Graduate Assistants will be forced into a change in health care benefits. After examining the costs and benefits, I have realized that our family, should we choose a plan that includes dependents, will be paying a disproportionate amount of a graduate assistant’s income in order to have health insurance compared to a graduate assistant without dependents. As it stands, our family of three qualifies for Husky, SNAP and WIC, because my husband makes so little income. This change in insurance adds insult to injury by increasing our health care costs exponentially simply because we are married and have a nine-month-old child. The choice we face is to change our care providers to those within the small network allowed by Husky or to pay the difference in cost UConn is not willing to absorb.

A single graduate assistant would be paying only $200 for an entire year of health care worth, according to the brochure from human resources, $3,988. That’s about 5% of the cost of the annual plan.

A family of three must pay $1,622 for a plan worth $8,368. That is about 45$ of the cost of the annual plan. We must pay an additional $250 deductible for seeing an off-campus doctor and, unless UConn has hired a pediatrician recently, anyone with 2+ dependents would need to do that. Because the therapist and psychiatrist I depend on for mental health care are not inside the new Cigna network, we will have to pay an additional $500 deductible for out-of-network coverage or change providers, a transition that is not at all good for my mental health. By the way, we already paid Anthem Blue Cross/Blue Shield a $500 deductible for the privilege of seeing out-of-network care providers this year.

Tell me: Is the assumption that a family of three must have two incomes? If so, how do you justify making such an assumption in a state and country where childcare costs so much and family leave is so rare?

I can only conclude that the University of Connecticut is knowingly practicing discrimination against its graduate students with dependents. Why should a marriage or parenthood force a student to live in poverty? I am disgusted by this practice. We are going to be living under the poverty line and incurring extra expenses simply because your university does not treat its graduate assistants with the same respect other employees receive. In addition to paying them salaries that hardly qualify as a living wage, your university asks for a significant amount of that money back in exchange for providing average-quality health care coverage. I hope that this practice changes in the future. For now, all I can do is write this letter and continue to beg the state of Connecticut for help, until my husband can finish his degree and obtain a position that pays a living wage.

Sincerely,

Anne-Marie Lindsey

 

 

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