garlic mustard harvesting day

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I remember last spring there was a meeting at the local library to discuss what should be done about the rampant takeover of garlic mustard. I couldn’t and still don’t understand why they weren’t just telling people to harvest and eat it. Put out recipe booklets,maybe?
It is really invasive but it’s edible and the more we eat it, the more it helps control it. Happy to do my part.

I think I’m going to experiment a bit and use the roots to make a flavored vinegar. I’ve only used garlic mustard in the past for pesto and salads. Though now that I’m thinking about it, I might have cooked them last year in a chicken dish. Seems like I remember that happening.

There is so much on the property I’ll have plenty to experiment with. This bin was just a small patch of it. I’ll probably dry some of it,too.

 

Lunchtime Links: how to grow beets, a retractable window garden, and an online map for freegans

Here’s today’s things….

how to grow beets, with brian campbell.

It turns out I’m no Dwight Schrute when it comes to beet growing so I really appreciated that. This is only the second time I’ve grown beets. I could not figure out why my seedlings were so close together. I had no idea the beet seed was actually several seeds. And I had so many questions about thinning.

See,ya’ll? Years of gardening experience and there are still things I have to learn.

 


This is pretty neat. Barreau&Charbonnet created this window garden for people with little space. It extends out during the day so plants can get sun and retracts back in at night.

Retractable Window Planter

Retractable Window Planter

It’s a cool concept. It’s probably not super flexible to different window designs but I bet someone with  DIY skills could build neat custom designs.


 

haul

Caleb Phillips and Ethan Welty founded Falling Fruit , an online resource map for dumpster divers, freegans, and foragers. I checked out my local locations and no freegan sources have been added but lots and lots of fruit & foraging spots. This is the sort of map that thrives with user input. My hope is that freegans will be conscientious when adding comments about the personal and legal safety for other divers. As I’ve touched on here before, some dumpster divers’ main concern isn’t the food safety but more the risk of harassment and arrest , and other issues to do with privilege. 

Recently, the pair has begun speaking at food justice conferences, contacting online freegan communities and handing out stickers, expanding the site’s fan base. Calling it the most extensive and diverse map of its kind, the pair’s ultimate goal is to shed a bright light on the enormous quantity of food that goes to waste–in this country and abroad.

Phillips and Welty are raising money to create a FallingFruit mobile app for foragers and divers through Barnraiser.us, a newly launched crowdfunding site specifically designed for food and sustainability projects. They hope to raise $10,000 by the end of May.

To create the dumpster map, men spent months combing the Internet for dumpster location information and painstakingly checking each entry before adding it to their site. Their hope is that other freegan sites such as trashwiki.org and freegan.info will embed the FallingFruit map.

To date, there are at least 2,500 bins on the map with up to five new ones added daily. Welty estimates that around 500 people are using the site every day and he expects the numbers to rise as summer kicks in. Along with most U.S. cities, map users have entered dumpsters in Antarctica, Jamaica, and even the North and South Pole, says Phillips.

“We wanted to take [dumpster diving] from being a secret hobby to something that illustrates first-hand how ubiquitous food waste is,” says Welty. Despite the fact that 40 percent of the food produced in the U.S. goes uneaten, few people spend much time thinking about food waste. But, Welty adds, “You can only feel [the magnitude of] it when you open up a dumpster and see what’s in it.”

via Civil Eats


 You can’t tell these hens what to do.

 

Lunchtime Links: Fire Escape Gardening, using Garlic Mustard Greens, and dealing with canned tomatoes

Some good things to pass along today.

 

Link→  17 Tips For Starting Your Own Herb Garden.

These are all great tips for small space gardening. The tip about buying seedlings versus seeds…might seem counterintuitive since seeds are less expensive but sometimes you have to do that.  do start everything from seed myself but it was a struggle this year to find adequate space. Cats & little kids don’t help.

 


What I Made Today shows how to use wild Garlic Mustard …the whole thing, leaves to roots. You probably have seen this stuff growing like crazy. I have a ton of it I am constantly pulling from the garden. Go ahead an eat it. It’s good stuff.
Link → Garlic Mustard Love


 

How Wild Food Foraging Can Lower the Cost of Groceries

How Wild Food Foraging Can Lower the Cost of Groceries

I know this isn’t possible for some people but if you have the time, physical ability and access, I highly recommend foraging. It was my Grandma who first taught me about foraging. I remember putting on jeans and a flannel shirt in the 95 degree summer heat to go berry picking. One of my best tips for wild berry foraging: dress like you’re living in Seattle, circa 1990. On one impromptu berry picking excursion last year, I wasn’t quote dressed for it and ended up looking like I’d been thrown into a cage with angry cats.

There is a map of public spaces free to forage on, in cities and rural areas. I think it will become more useful as people start adding more spots…. none of the sweet spots I know in my area are on the map. Map of Where To Forage

I’ve written about foraging a little bit on my other blogs…most recently this past Spring when my older kids went out and foraged ramps. The blackberries are just ripening now in my favorite picking spot, so I’ll probably do a post on  those soon. This was from last year:

originally on my post Garden Bounty

And I have no shame. I combined them with day-old packaged shortcakes that were super cheap for dessert